Member’s pick

 

18th January meeting

The nine people attending felt that Wendy Cope’s poem ‘Bloody Men’ was the one they’d go for. It was read by Kathy and goes

‘Bloody men are like bloody buses

You wait for about a year

And as soon as one approaches your stop

Two or three others appear         Etc. Etc

12th February Meeting

The chosen poem from this evening is a lovely sonnet by Edmund Spenser

‘One day I wrote your name upon the sand,

But came the waves and washed it away’   etc,etc

19th March Meeting

Hamish Blair’s poem ‘Bloody Orkney’ was popular but we went for John Cooper-Clarke’s  ‘I married a monster from Outer Space’ brilliantly read by Dawn. 

16th April Meeting

Dave’s beautiful rendition of Ewan McColl’s classic ‘Dirty Old Town’ did justice to that wonderful song with its moving lyrics and  haunting melody. A memorable experience and well-deserving of the applause it received.

14th May Meeting

No overall poem was chosen but the six or so haunting and nostalgic Housman poems read by John and Chris proved perfect examples of our chosen theme of ‘Regrets’. 

16th June Meeting

We deferred making a choice until next month when we hope to choose three poems to recommend to visitors to our site.

9th July Meeting

After much deliberation and horse-trading ( not really ) the poems we recommend to all our visitors are as follows;

1st   ‘Futility’ by Wilfred Owen

2nd  ‘Fern Hill’ by Dylan Thomas

3rd   ‘The Emperor of Ice-cream’ by Wallace Stevens 

Please read or re-read them as they are superb poems.

13th August Meeting

There was no poem overall that stood out but Kathy’s choice of a centuries-old Persian poet ,Rumi, was intriguing and enjoyable. 

25th September Meeting

John Donne’s poem ‘Passion’ was a wonderful example of a marvellous poet able to speak down the ages.

15th October Meeting

Some terrific poems but overall the prose extract from ‘The Dead’ by James Joyce and Helen Dunmore’s poem had the most impact.

!2th  November Meeting

It was difficult to choose from an eclectic mix, but David Aldred’s own poem was much enjoyed by us all.